6 things to consider before commissioning a game

You want a game and are pretty certain that your audience would love one; you might even already have an idea about what that game could be? Before you start, there are a few things you should consider…
 

1. Are you doing all you can in your existing marketing efforts?

While a game can be a very powerful extra tool in your marketing mix, it’s important to remember that games are not a magic bullet. Simply putting a game on your website is unlikely to bring lots of new customers flooding in. It needs to be built to complement your existing social, content and/or direct marketing so if your organisation isn’t regularly doing any of those, a game probably isn’t going to work for you. You need to have the right channels in place so that when the time comes to launch a game you can ensure you can give it the best possible kick-start.
 

2. Do you want to create an experience or an advert?

Great content should appeal to the audience first and foremost. As marketers, when creating that content we should be asking ourselves: What questions, interests or desires am I addressing with this? The same is true for games, but some marketers will think of branded games as nothing more than an interactive advert and feel the need to put their product front and centre of the experience. Consumers are already suspicious of brands in their entertainment space and don’t really appreciate intrusive advertising, if you’re not careful, you may end up giving them a negative experience of your brand rather than a positive one. First and foremost, it’s a game, it needs to be fun and playable; while we’re on that…
 

3. How comfortable with the theme of death are you?

This might sound like an odd question, bear with me though. Sometimes we’ll start working on a game with a client, we’ll settle on an idea, everyone will think it’s great, and we may have even started building it, when we are asked the question: “Could  the main character NOT die?”

The client realise that they’re not that comfortable with the theme of death being associated with their brand (no matter how obscurely, were not talking gruesome blood baths here). But death, loss & jeopardy are at the heart of many game genres; the sense of danger is after all, what makes them fun! The problem is, if you take a game genre that is built around this danger and then remove it, it’s not going to be much fun to play.

Issues like these can be resolved of course, so it’s important to make sure that you go with a genre and theme that suits your brand, as well as your audience. This brings us to…
 

4. Who are your audience?

Is your product or service mainly intended for men in their 20s? Or women in their 60s? Generally speaking these groups tend to like playing different sorts of games and the genre of game you choose is very important in terms of holding their attention.
 

5. How much do you want to spend? (And how long have you got to build it?)

Arguably the most important question, your budget will dictate whether the project is bespoke, or based on something that already exists. A large scope, bespoke game can take a long time to develop and obviously, the more man hours it takes to build, the more costly it’s likely to be.

Many clients are initially worried about revealing their budgets; this is understandable as we all want to feel like we are getting our money’s worth but because games can take some time to develop there is often a disparity between a client’s expectation of what their budget will buy them and what is actually achievable.

For example our Team Cooper white label pre-existing games engines range from £2k – £15k based on a wide range of customisable elements whilst a completely bespoke game could cost anything form £10k to £250k – have a read of this post for more details on budget expectations.
 

6. What are your goals for the game?

What are you trying to achieve? More social followers, newsletter sign ups, increased engagement, brand loyalty or to stand out from the competition?

It’s important to answer these strategic questions up front, they can inform the content and elements to include in a game, ensuring that success is accurately measured against your objectives.

Offering something in return can help achieve these goals. Appealing to our competitive nature, offering leader boards and incentives to share your score on social sites encourages replay and revisits.

For example, we’ve recently launched a game for DFDS which enters scores over a 1000 points into a free prize draw to win a PlayStation 4, mini cruise holidays, ferry crossing tickets and footballs, the prizes were a real incentive and the game required a certain level of skill, there can be a temptation to make something too easy to get as many entrants as possible, but that can compromise game play and credibility, this level of difficulty kept players coming back, engaging with the brand over and over again to increase their score for a chance to win.
 

There you have it…

Consider carefully where a game fits into your wider marketing plan, who’s it for and what would they like to play? What do you want to get out of your game in relation to your strategy and how much do you have to invest? These are all important points to think about and can be easily overlooked in the excitement of commissioning a new game – and it is exciting, but as with all the elements in your marketing comms plan, they need to be the right fit and asking these questions will make sure you get a game that works for you and your audience.

Tags: , , , ,

CKSK Coors Light Ice Cave Challenge
CKSK Coors Light Ice Cave Challenge
Can games increase footfall at your exhibition stand?
Increase footfall at your expo stand
White Label Conga Challenge
Conga Challenge
Every Second Counts Conga
Every Second Counts Conga
A Sackful of Christmas Games
A Sackful of Christmas Games
5 reasons to order a branded Christmas game
5 reason to order a christmas game
Melbourne Man
Melbourne Man
Beat the Beasts
Beat the Beasts
Santa's Rooftop Runner
Santa's Rooftop Runner
Win a Nintendo Classic Mini: NES
Competition Time!
White Label Rooftop Runner
Rooftop Runner
We do games, we love games, but why should you?
We do games, we love games, but why should you?
Jack’s Quayside Kickabout
Quayside Kickabout
Beazley Conga Challenge
Beazley Conga
Jingle Jet
Jingle Jet
Experiencing Unity 4.5
Experiencing Unity 4.5
How much does a mobile game cost to develop?
How much do mobile games cost?
5 Things I Discovered While Writing 'Attack of the Tempus Fugitives!'
5 Things I Discovered While Writing 'Attack of the Tempus Fugitives!'
Game Developers Available For Hire.
Game Developers Available For Hire.
Attack of the Tempus Fugitives!
Attack of the Tempus Fugitives!
Maze Collector
Maze Collector
Farter Christmas
Farter Christmas
Farter Christmas: Origins
Farter Christmas: Origins
Dani's Castle - Hidden Treasures
Hidden Treasures
Fairly OddParents - Scary GodParents
Scary GodParents
New website, new beginnings with HTML5, HAXE & Unity
New beginnings with HTML5
Choices
Choices
Fraxinus
Fraxinus
Fishing With Percy
Fishing with Percy
The Marathon
The Marathon

Comments

Be the first to comment on this post!

Add to the Comments

Submit